Home / Opinions / Princess Nokia: Brave “Bruja” with Butternut Soup

Princess Nokia: Brave “Bruja” with Butternut Soup

Destiny Frasqueri (Princess Nokia), the woman who threw her soup at the man yelling racist slurs on the L train. PHOTO/ Flickr Creative Commons
Destiny Frasqueri (Princess Nokia), the woman who threw her soup at the man yelling racist slurs on the L train. PHOTO/ Flickr Creative Commons

By: Alexandra Altamirano

Published: October 18th, 2017

A video of a man yelling racial slurs at a group of young black males on Brooklyn’s L train went viral on social media this past month.

The young men were on the L train when a man who appeared to be inebriated started yelling “n******” over and over at them. He justified his slurs by saying that he was a “lawyer from NYU,” and was “using his first amendment right.”

“First amendment! First amendment! Who cares,” the man continued as he pranced back and forth claiming it was his right. He howled and jumped up and down and bystanders stepped in, including New York rapper Princess Nokia who took out her phone and struck back with the power of media attention.

“Say it again, this man is a racist. This man is on the L train on the way to Brooklyn saying the N-word … I’m going to put this on the news and everybody’s going to know what a bigot you are. We can’t let them get away with everything!” she said.

As he continued to yell, a civilian stood in front of him and told him to stop as he guarded him from touching anyone.  He was warned several times by another bystander to stop or that he would receive a punch in the face.

Shortly after, a man threw the yeller out of the train and he was then pushed and shoved until he was on the ground. Princess Nokia stepped in and threw what should’ve been her lunch of hot butternut squash soup on the racist man.

“Get the f*** out!” she yelled as she threw the empty cup at him.

Defenseless, the man tried to get back into the train but was met with pushes and a kick from the rap artist herself.

Once the video went viral, Princess Nokia went on a Twitter rant outing herself as the woman who threw the cup of hot soup at the racist man.

“I instantly reacted to hate speech being slurred at children. Young innocent teenage boys on their way to basketball practice. The community of patrons on that cart stood together against racism and hatred that day. It was a bond of individuals against harassment.”

Along with public praise came criticism for the use of pushes and kicks against the racist man. She quickly denied the “heroine” name she was given saying, “I don’t encourage others to face the same situations with the forwardness that I do. Those are the risks I take as an individual.”

It was also pointed out that this man has attacked people with racial slurs before this incident and they were also recorded on video. With her recent media attention, Princess Nokia encouraged others to speak up when confronted with hate speech.

Destiny Frasqueri (Princess Nokia), a New York native, has been a part of the rap scene since 2010. Her latest album, “1992,” is filled with tales of her Puerto Rican background, her “Bruja” grandmothers, and the “ABCs of New York”, a modern-day “Ten crack commandments”.  It has also garnered over two million streams. As she’s toured the world in places like Spain, Greece, and the UK, Frasqueri has also managed to create a successful GoFundMe for her beloved Puerto Rico while bringing media attention to the matter itself. She is best known for her unapologetically posh-ghetto style that has gotten her attention in UK media. Her music resonates mostly with queers, women, and people of color, or a mixture of all three, and she has encouraged them to come up to the front of the stage at her concerts.

If you dig the unapologetic attitude of Cardi B, and a fierce female voice, you’ll find comfort in Princess Nokia’s “1922.”

If you don’t want butternut squash thrown on you, you know what not to do.

Print Friendly

About bcexcelsior

Check Also

"Allahu akbar" is the first phrase said by Muslims during the call for prayer and the prayer itself; unfortunately, it has been tarnished by violence. PHOTO/ www.getreligion.org

What “Allahu Akbar” Really Means

By Zainab Iqbal Published: November 8th, 2017 If you are not a Muslim, or if …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *